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Saturday, December 08, 2018

The persistent myth of alternative splicing

I'm convinced that widespread alternative splicing does not occur in humans or in any other species. It's true that the phenomenon exists but it's restricted to a small number of genes—probably fewer than 1000 genes in humans. Most of the unusual transcripts detected by modern technology are rare and unstable, which is consistent with the idea that they are due to splicing errors. Genome annotators have rejected almost all of those transcripts.

You can see links to my numerous posts on this topic at: Alternative splicing and the gene concept and Are splice variants functional or noise?.

Wednesday, December 05, 2018

The textbook view of alternative splicing

As most of you know, I'm interested in the problem of alternative splicing. I believe that the number of splice variants that have been detected is perfectly consistent with the known rate of splicing errors and that there's no significant evidence to support the claim that alternative splicing leading to the production of biologically relevant protein variants is widespread. In fact, there's plenty of evidence for the opposite view; namely, splicing errors (lack of conservation, low abundance, improbable protein predictions, inability to detect the predicted proteins).

My preferred explanation is definitely the minority view. What puzzles me is not the fact that the majority is wrong () but the fact that they completely ignore any other explanation of the data and consider the case for abundant alternative splicing to be settled.