Monday, April 13, 2009

Wild chimpanzees exchange meat for sex

 
I don't know if it's true that Wild chimpanzees exchange meat for sex but I know some vegetarians who may find it interesting.
Wild female chimpanzees copulate more frequently with males who share meat with them over long periods of time, according to a study led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany, published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE April 8.
It probably works for humans as well.

I'm going out to buy some steaks for dinner.

The original paper is Gomes and Boesch (2009)


Gomes, C.M. and Boesch, C. (2009) Wild Chimpanzees Exchange Meat for Sex on a Long-Term Basis. PLoS ONE 4(4): e5116. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0005116

10 comments :

  1. For all practical purposes, PLoS ONE is NOT peer-reviewed. Everything you read there is suspect.

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  3. I think PLoS ONE is peer reviewed, they just don't select/choose the articles that'll be published.

    About the article I heard about it in the Scientific American Podcast, one interesting point is that this seem to be for meat only. Altought the male gives other kinds of food to female, only meat correlates with increased sex.

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  4. What... no "bring home the bacon" jokes yet?

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  5. As the Managing Editor of PLoS ONE, I can confirm that all content published in the journal is peer reviewed. Full details of the peer review process can be found at:
    http://www.plosone.org/static/review.action and since launch we have benefited from the input of over 9,000 individual peer reviewers (http://www.plosone.org/static/peerReviewers.action)

    Dan - you are correct (though missing a few words). We do not select content based on how 'impactful' or 'interesting' or 'broad' etc the article might be. Instead we peer review each article to determine whether it is scientifically sound, in which case it is worthy to join the scientific literature and so we publish it, and then we let future readers decide whether it was interesting to them.

    Peter Binfield
    Managing Editor, PLoS ONE

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  6. From an author's perspective, I can confirm that PLoS ONE is indeed peer-reviewed. Just because, as Peter said, papers are not judged on "impact" and so forth does not mean that they aren't thoroughly vetted.

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  7. I'm going out to buy some steaks for dinner.Did it work?

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  8. So you are saying that Steak and Blowjob Day has an evolutionary basis?

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  9. Still true, but today money = meat. But really, who needs sex anymore when there's blogs? Blog selection...

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  10. ... in other words, PZ's gettin' more than you are.

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