Wednesday, September 04, 2013

James Hood (1776-1859)

We were at a wedding in Orillia (Ontario) on the weekend with my son and his wife. On the way home we took the long route and stopped at the Creemore Union Cemetery in Creemore, Ontario. The town is known mainly for its beer (Creemore Springs Brewery) but we were looking for ancestors.

James Hood was born on April 6, 1775 in Kelso, Scotland but his family moved to the Glascow area a few years later. His father was a Calton weaver and so was James. The recession following the end of the Napoleonic Wars meant that the weavers could no longer make a decent living and the British government encouraged them to emigrate to Canada by offering free passage and free land.

James and his family arrived in Canada on the "Prompt" in 1820. They settled originally in the area around Perth, Ontario. My wife, Leslie (neé Rodger) descends from James' son William whose family remained in Perth. James Hood and many of his other children moved to the Creemore area in 1830 and that's where he died on July 30, 1859.

James Hood is my wife's great, great, great, great, grandfather (and the great5 grandfather of Gordon and Jane). He is also the great, great, great grandfather of Mitt Romney [see A Mormon Tale].


3 comments :

  1. They did encourage the different peoples of Great britain as they were afraid of the dominate american settlers that came in the refugee wave and the later wave up till , I think, the 1830;s.
    Ontario was about 80-85 % yankee. Thus the origin of our accent.
    I don't believe British immigration changed the original Yankkes morally or intellectually , just like the accent, and so I see myself as largely a yankke Canadian or rather a puritan Englishman with segregated later historic events defining each people differently.
    Not my biology but my identity , as with all of us, is primarily Evangelical English by way of America.
    Identity of moral/intellect and not biology defines the species of mankind.
    I walk the bruce trail near the creemore area but beer isn't my favourite booze.

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  2. I read somewhere, many years ago, that the last time a person was killed by a cougar in Ontario, it occurred in Creemore.

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  3. I read somewhere, many years ago, that the last time a person was killed by a cougar in Ontario, it occurred in Creemore.

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