Friday, April 18, 2008

Evolution at the Chautauqua Institution

 
The program for Week 9 (Aug. 17-23) at the Chautauqua Institution has been posted [Week Nine: Darwin and Linnaeus: Their Impact on Our View of the Natural World].

Here's the lineup of lectures in the main amphitheater (morning) and the Hall of Philosophy (afternoon).

Monday Aug. 18
10:45 am: Kenneth Miller, prof. of biology, Brown University; author, Finding Darwin's God.
Tuesday Aug. 19
10:45 am: Beth Shapiro, asst. prof. of biology, Penn State Univ.; researcher in field of ancient DNA.
2:00 pm: Carl Zimmer, science journalist, author, Evolution: The Triumph of an Idea.
Wednesday Aug. 20
10:45 am: Edward Larson, prof. of law, Pepperdine Univ; Pulitzer Prize-winner for Summer for the Gods.
2:00 pm: Barbara J. King, prof. of anthropology, College of William & Mary; author, Evolving God
Thursday, Aug. 21
10:45 am: Spencer Wells, population geneticist; director of Genographic Project.
2:00 pm: Eugenie C. Scott, executive director, National Center for Science Education.
Friday, Aug. 22
10:45 am: Mattias Klum, National Geographic Society photographer; documentary filmmaker, The Linnaeus Expedition.
2:00 pm: Michael Ruse, professor of philosophy, Florida State University; director of program in history and philosophy of science, Bristol Univ.

Throughout the week you can further improve your mind by taking special courses. You might be interested in course #1948 on What Is Evolution. I can guarantee you a good time in the course. We will finish at 2 pm on Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday.

For entertainment there's the Philadelphia Dance Company on Monday night, the very excellent Chautauqua Symphony on Tuesday night, a Vince Gill concert on Friday night, and an evening with Bill Cosby on Saturday night.

I'm also going to be there for week 4 on The Ethical Frontiers of Science.


5 comments:

  1. you need an expansion of your defintion of evolution that does not treat organismal biology as if it were not a part of evolution.

    "nothing makes sense in evolution but in the light of biology"

    I think Martindale say that.

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  2. better lock the doors of that auditorium.

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  3. Yes, we must be really "confused" about evolution since we reject it. We know this because the simple fact that we reject it shows that we don't understand it. If we understood it, we would accept it.

    Mats

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  4. Mats says,

    Yes, we must be really "confused" about evolution since we reject it. We know this because the simple fact that we reject it shows that we don't understand it. If we understood it, we would accept it.

    Yes. So, what's your point?

    ReplyDelete